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BEAN, FAVA (Broad Bean, Faba Bean, Field Bea, Bell Bea, Tic Bean)
Latin name: Vicia faba
Family name:
Fabaceae
Nutrition value:This food is low in Sodium, and very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Riboflavin, Niacin, Phosphorus and Potassium, and a very good source of Folate, Copper and Manganese.
Preparation: The beans have two outer layers that need to be removed before eating, the pod and the outer shell.
Cooking: Cook the beans with or without pods in a pot of boiling water until tender, about 3-5 minutes.
Storage: Store bean pods in a plastic bag and place it in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. The pods will keep for 5-7 days. Cooked and peeled beans in a plastic bag can be refrigerated for up to 5 days at most.

BEAN, SNAP (Green Beans, French Beans, Runner Beans, String Beans)
Latin name: Phaseolus vulgaris
Family name: Fabaceae
Nutrition value: This food is low in Sodium, and very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Protein, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium and Copper, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Folate and Manganese.
Preparation: Snap or cut both ends off before cooking.
Cooking: Steaming is preferred, it will lock in much of the nutrient.
Storage: Store snap beans in plastic bag, it can be refrigerated 5-7 days.

BEET
Latin name: Beta vulgaris
Family name: Amaranthaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Protein, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Phosphorus and Zinc, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), Vitamin K, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Vitamin B6, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Potassium, Copper and Manganese..
Preparation: Wash beets gently to avoid breaking the skin which allows nutrient to escape.
Cooking: Microwaving retains the most nutrient. Steaming is acceptable but takes 25-45 minutes. Beets can also be roasted in the oven at 325F until tender to develop their sweetness.
Storage: The leaves will sap the moisture from the beet root so trim the leaves 2 inches from the root. Do not trim the tail. Store the leaves in a separate plastic bag and use within 2 days. The root bulbs should also be bagged and can be stored in the refrigerator crisper drawer 7-10 days.

BROCCOLI
Latin name: Brassica oleracea
Family name: Brassicaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Protein, Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), Thiamin, Riboflavin, Pantothenic Acid, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Selenium, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Vitamin B6, Folate, Potassium and Manganese.
Preparation: Rinse broccoli under cold water. Soak in salt water if bugs are found in the crevices.
Cooking: It’s almost never a good idea to boil Broccoli because it all but ruins flavor and texture. Steaming and blanching are the best methods to preserve the most flavor and nutrition. Whatever the method, don’t overcook!
Storage: Wrap unwashed Broccoli in plastic wrap or tuck into a plastic bag and store in the vegetable drawer or crisper section of your refrigerator until ready to use. It will keep for five to seven days, but is best used right away. Wrapped Broccoli can go right into the refrigerator.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS
Latin name: Brassica oleracea
Family name: Brassicaceae
Nutrition value: a very good source of folate, vitamin A/C/E/K, manganese, dietary fiber, potassium and vitamin B6, and a good source of tryptophan (an essential amino acid), thiamin, omega-3 fatty acids, iron, phosphorus, protein, magnesium, riboflavin, copper and calcium.
Preparation: Rinse with cold water and drain. Trim stem ends without cutting the base of leaves or the Brussels Sprouts will come apart during cooking. Cut a shallow “x” in the base of Sprouts, so the stems will cook faster. If you wish, cut large Sprouts lengthwise in half for a “bite size” option.
Cooking: This is the best way to cook Brussels Sprouts because it preserves flavor and nutrition. Steaming also keeps the sprouts intact, reducing the potential for strong flavors. Bring 1 to 2 inches of water to a boil in a pot.
Storage: Keep unwashed Brussels Sprouts in a plastic or paper bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. They will keep for up to a week.

CABBAGE
Latin name: Brassica oleracea
Family name: Brassicaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Protein, Thiamin, Calcium, Phosphorus and Copper, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Vitamin B6, Folate, Magnesium, Potassium and Manganese.
Preparation: Remove the wilted, discolored, and thicker outer leaves. Rinse under cold running water. Cut the cabbage head lengthwise in half and then into wedges (or quarters). If there are signs of worms or insects after the head is cut open, rid the cabbage of them by soaking it in salt water for 20 minutes.
Cooking: Cabbage can be eaten raw or cooked. It can be boiled, steamed, braised, sauteed, stir-fried, and microwaved. It should be cooked until just tender. Overcooking will result in limp, pasty cabbage and produce a very unpleasant smell. The unpleasant smell is caused by the sulfur compounds that are released when the cabbage is cooked to long.
Storage: Store the cabbage uncut to prevent vitamin C loss. Place the uncut head in a perforated plastic bag and store up to two weeks in the refrigerator crisper drawer. If the cabbage is cut, wrap the remainder of the head tightly in plastic wrap but use within a couple of days.

CABBAGE, CHINESE (NAPA)
Latin name: Brassica rapa
Family name: Brassicaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Dietary Fiber, Protein, Thiamin, Niacin and Phosphorus, and a very good source of Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Riboflavin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Potassium and Manganese. High in sodium.
Preparation: Remove the wilted, discolored, and thicker outer leaves. Rinse under cold running water. Cut the cabbage head lengthwise in half and then into wedges (or quarters). If there are signs of worms or insects after the head is cut open, rid the cabbage of them by soaking it in salt water for 20 minutes.
Cooking: Cabbage can be eaten raw or cooked. It can be boiled, steamed, braised, sauteed, stir-fried, and microwaved. It should be cooked until just tender. Overcooking will result in limp, pasty cabbage and produce a very unpleasant smell. The unpleasant smell is caused by the sulfur compounds that are released when the cabbage is cooked to long.
Storage: Store the cabbage uncut to prevent vitamin C loss. Place the uncut head in a perforated plastic bag and store up to two weeks in the refrigerator crisper drawer. If the cabbage is cut, wrap the remainder of the head tightly in plastic wrap but use within a couple of days.

CANTALOUPE
Latin name: Cucumis melo var. cantalupensis
Family name: Cucurbitaceae
Nutrition value: This food is low in Saturated Fat and Sodium, and very low in Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Dietary Fiber, Niacin, Vitamin B6 and Folate, and a very good source of Vitamin A, Vitamin C and Potassium.
Preparation: Make sure to wash the cantaloupe before you cut it, to prevent food poisoning from spreading with the knife. Gently scoop out seeds with a spoon and cut the fruit into wedges or use a melon baller.
Storage: Despite the fact that cantaloupe does not technically ripen once it is harvested, it will soften at room temperature for a day or two (the flavor will not change). The whole melon will refrigerate up to five days; a sliced cantaloupe will refrigerate up to three days.

CARROT
Latin name: Daucus carota
Family name: Apiaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Thiamin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate and Manganese, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K and Potassium.
Preparation: They only require cleaning, peeling, and cutting to desired size. Small, young carrots and baby carrots do not need to be peeled but older carrots and those with surface blemishes should be peeled.
Cooking: Carrots can be eaten raw or cooked, but cooking carrots brings out their natural sweetness. Cooking carrots also breaks down the fiber in beta-carotene, making it more usable to the body. Carrots should be cooked only until they are tender-crisp to ensure maximum flavor. Overcooking may also destroy some of the nutrients contained in carrots. It is important that the carrots, whether they are whole, sticks, slices, or diced cubes, are uniform size pieces to allow them to cook evenly.
Storage: Carrots can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a month if stored properly. To prevent condensation from forming, wrap the carrots in a paper towel and then place them in a bag in the refrigerator, or use a perforated plastic bag. Excess moisture will cause them to rot. If the carrots still have the greens attached, cut them off 2 inches above the crown to prevent them from drawing moisture out of the carrots.

CAULIFLOWER
Latin name: Brassica oleracea
Family name: Brassicaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Protein, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Magnesium and Phosphorus, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Vitamin B6, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Potassium and Manganese.
Preparation: Cauliflower should not be washed until it is going to be cut up and used. After the cauliflower has been cut up as shown below, soak it in salt water or vinegar water to help force any insects out that are lodged within the florets.
Cooking: Cauliflower can be cooked using several methods. Some common methods are steaming, boiling, sauteeing, stir frying, and microwaving. Cauliflower should be cooked until they are tender-crisp. If it is cooked too long, the florets will fall apart and become mushy.
Storage: Cauliflower should be left unwashed when storing. Store in the refrigerator, with stem side down, in an open plastic bag or use a perforated plastic bag. This will avoid excess moisture, which causes the cauliflower to deteriorate faster. Store for 5 to 7 days.

CELERIAC
Latin name: Apium graveolens rapaceum
Family name: Apiaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin B6, Magnesium, Potassium and Manganese, and a very good source of Vitamin C and Phosphorus.
Preparation: Trim leaves (if present) and root end. Scrub well and cut off the skin quite thickly to remove any brown bits and the root channels in the base. Drop cut pieces in water with a squeeze of lemon juice to prevent discolouration
Cooking: Grate or cut into thin sticks for serving raw (blanch briefly in boiling water for a slightly softer, smoother texture). Boil cubes until tender (15 - 20 minutes) before mashing with potatoes and garlic, or other root vegetables. Celeriac also works well in stews and roast celeriac is excellent with meat.
Storage: Refrigerate in a plastic bag (unsealed). Celeriac can keep for 2 or 3 weeks.

CELERY
Latin name: Apium graveolens
Family name: Apiaceae
Nutrition value: This food is low in Saturated Fat, and very low in Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Riboflavin, Vitamin B6, Pantothenic Acid, Calcium, Magnesium and Phosphorus, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Folate, Potassium and Manganese.
Preparation: To prepare Celery, rinse it well in clear, cold water, separating the stalks slightly as you rinse. Cut off the base and very tips of each stalk. To dice or cut into attractive crescents, cut a Celery rib crosswise to any desired width. Celery most often is consumed raw, but it’s also great cooked, especially as part of other dishes.
Cooking: Stir-frying is an excellent way to cook Celery. Cut into small pieces and place in a wok or skillet that has been heated with a small amount of oil. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes or until tender.
Storage: To store, trim base and remove any damaged ribs. Rinse and put in a plastic bag. Refrigerate in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. Celery keeps for about two weeks.

CHARD
Latin name: Beta vulgaris
Family name: Amaranthaceae
Nutrition value: Excellent concentrations of vitamin K, vitamin A, vitamin C, magnesium, manganese, potassium, iron, vitamin E, and dietary fiber. Swiss chard also emerges as a very good or good source of copper, calcium, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, protein, phosphorus, vitamin B1, zinc, folate, biotin, niacin and pantothenic acid.
Preparation: Like other leafy vegetables, chard needs to be thoroughly washed before cooking since sand and other debris tend to nestle in its leaves. Instead of using a colander and running water over the leaves, the best way to remove debris from leafy greens is to dunk and soak them in plenty of water
Cooking: For salads and sandwiches, it’s best to use young, tender leaves. For a simple side vegetable, leaves of medium size can be quickly sautéed—the stalks can be prepared this way, too. Older leaves and stalks are best steamed, boiled, or added to soups, as the stems require a longer cooking time to become tender than the leaves do.
Storage: Choose chard with tender, glossy leaves and crisp stalks. Store unwashed chard, wrapped in a plastic bag, in the refrigerator for up to three days.

COLLARDS
Latin name: Brassica oleracea
Family name: Brassicaceae
Nutrition value: This food is low in Saturated Fat, and very low in Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Protein, Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), Thiamin, Niacin, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Potassium, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Riboflavin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Calcium, Iron and Manganese.
Preparation: Clean collard leaves thoroughly before cooking by dunking each leaf into a bowl of fresh water several times. Then rinse under running water. The stalks are generally too tough to eat, so leaves should be stripped from the stalks and torn into small pieces before cooking. Steaming is not the best way to cook collards because it gives them a somewhat tough texture.
Cooking: Simmer collards first in a small amount of water for 10 minutes. Then drain them and sauté in olive oil with herbs or spices until tender, about 10 minutes.
Storage: Wrap collards in a damp paper towel and store in a perforated plastic bag. If fresh, they will keep for up to a week.

CORN, SWEET
Latin name: Zea mays
Family name: Poaceae
Nutrition value: Corn contains beta-carotene, small amounts of B vitamins and vitamin C. It is a useful source of protein and is rich in fiber. Canned corn is less nutritious, higher in calories and usually much higher in added sodium.
Preparation: Shuck the corn by peeling back the husk and completely removing it. Remove the thin silk that runs along the kernels of the corn. Remove excess silk with a vegetable brush or with a damp paper towel. Break or cut off any remaining corn stalk. The corn is now ready to cook.
Cooking: Place shucked corn into a large pot and cover with cold water. Add a tablespoon of sugar to keep corn sweet and tender. Cook corn over high heat and when water comes to a rapid boil, the corn is done. Do not overcook. Remove from the heat, drain, and serve. Corn can stand in the hot water (away from heat) for 5 or 10 minutes.
Storage: To store corn, leave the corn in the husk and refrigerate as soon as possible. If corn has been husked, place it in a plastic bag and store in the refrigerator. It is best to eat it as soon as possible. Corn cut off the cob can be frozen for 6 months to a year.

CUCUMBER
Latin name: Cucumis sativus
Family name: Cucurbitaceae
Nutrition value: This food is low in Saturated Fat, and very low in Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Vitamin A, Pantothenic Acid, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Manganese, and a very good source of Vitamin C, Vitamin K and Potassium.
Preparation: Cucumbers are best eaten raw (peeled or unpeeled) and are traditionally used as a basic salad ingredient or on vegetable trays. They are increasingly popular sliced and placed on vegetarian sandwiches. They can also be used in salsas.
Cooking: They can also be sliced, dipped in batter and fried. Cucumbers can be cooked until just crisp and flavored with olive oil and herbs. They can also be added to soups.
Storage: Unpeeled cucumbers should be washed in cold water to remove any soil or other dirt. Cucumbers should be refrigerated in a plastic bag soon after purchase. They should keep for about a week.

EGGPLANT
Latin name: Solanum melongena
Family name: Solanaceae
Nutrition value: Low in Saturated Fat, Sodium, and Cholesterol. High in Dietary Fiber, Folate, Potassium, Manganese, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Thiamin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Pantothenic Acid, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Copper.
Preparation: Salting eggplant is a preparation method some cooks do to extract bitterness out of an eggplant. It is generally not effective for taking away bitterness (be sure to buy fresh eggplant and you won`t have this problem) but it is an excellent way to draw out the vegetable`s moisture, so it remains firm upon cooking.
Cooking: The first thing to know about eggplant is it will soak up just about all the oil you throw at it. Great healthy cooking methods are baking, grilling and stir-frying.
Storage: Depending on the freshness factor of the eggplant at the time of purchase, it may be refrigerated for up to 4 days (up to 7 days if you pick right from the garden). However, it is best to use them as soon as possible, preferably within a day.

ESCAROLE
Latin name: Cichorium endivia
Family name: Asteraceae
Nutrition value: This food is low in Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Vitamin C, Folate, Vitamin B12, Phosphorus and Potassium, and a very good source of Vitamin A, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Zinc, Copper and Manganese.
Preparation: Clean the leaves thoroughly before cooking by dunking each leaf into a bowl of fresh water several times
Cooking:
Storage: Escarole is a leafy salad green not adapted to long storage. The relative humidity in rooms where escarole is held should be kept above 95 % to prevent wilting.